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How To Get Suboxone Prescription In OHIO?

With our streamlined process, getting a suboxone recommendation in Ohio is easy. Visit our website and get your suboxone prescription in less than 24 hours from the comfort of your home. Let’s see how to get suboxone online:

Fill-up and Submit Suboxone Evaluation Form Online

Fill out an online evaluation form with your medical details and book an appointment with one of our licensed suboxone doctors in Ohio at a time that suits you.

GET EVALUATED IN NEW YORK BY A LICENCED PROFESSIONAL

A Licensed healthcare professional will connect you via an audio-video call to determine the need for suboxone treatment.

START YOUR SUBOXONE TREATMENT AFTER BEING APPROVED

If Suboxone is appropriate for your treatment, our doctors will electronically send your prescription to a pharmacy of your choice. You can receive your prescription from the pharmacy and start your treatment with Suboxone.

A medication that holds miracles to transform your life!

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a proven medication that can help you break free from the grip of opioid addiction. It reduces cravings and withdrawal symptoms, allowing you to regain control of your life.

Moreover, Suboxone is a combination of two drugs – buprenorphine and naloxone. Both decrease the severity of withdrawal symptoms and reduce dependence on opioids in the long term. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved buprenorphine and naloxone sublingual in 2018.

Suboxone comes in two forms:

  • Tablet
  • Sublingual film

Both dissolve in your mouth quickly and offer the same results. However, tablets are less expensive than film, so many patients prefer it. On the other hand, some patients prefer the film because it can be more discreet and convenient.

How Does Suboxone Work?

Suboxone contains two components, i.e., buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine works by tricking the brain into thinking that it is receiving opioids. Whereas naloxone blocks the activation of opioid receptors, thereby reversing the euphoric effects of buprenorphine. Opioid Receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found in the brain. They mediate the human body’s response to most hormones, including opioids. Opioid receptor activation results in feelings of pleasure and reward. The combination of buprenorphine and naloxone restricts the intoxication of opioids and prevents opioid cravings. It also causes withdrawal symptoms and helps you transition back to everyday life.

Which Conditions Can You Treat With Suboxone?

Opioid Addiction

Suboxone for Opioid Dependence

Suboxone is FDA-approved to treat opioid dependence or opioid use disorder. It helps treat opioid dependence by reducing the opioid cravings. Moreover, suboxone withdrawal symptoms can occur when opioid use is stopped or reduced.

Long Term  Opioid Use

Harm Reduction

When you use Suboxone, it will reduce the risk of overuse and other health complications associated with opioid abuse. Suboxone blocks the effects of other opioids and discourages misuse, minimizing the chances of opioid overdose.

Opioid Withdrawal

Suboxone for Pain

Suboxone may be prescribed for chronic pain management. Buprenorphine content of Suboxone is a partial opioid agonist. It can relieve pain without the same risk of addiction and overdose associated with full opioid agonists. Its unique pharmacological profile reduces the risk of addiction and overdose
History of Relapse

Detoxification

Suboxone can be used to detoxify from opioids, making the withdrawal process more comfortable and manageable. Moreover, Suboxone offers a smoother transition by minimizing the severity of withdrawal symptoms.

Desire for MAT

Depression

Some Suboxone doctors in Ohio use Suboxone off-label to manage depression, particularly in individuals with co-occurring opioid use disorder and depression. They use Suboxone because buprenorphine has mood-stabilizing properties.

Pregnancy and Opioid Addiction

Support for Recovery

Suboxone is used as part of a comprehensive addiction treatment program. This program may include counseling and therapy, providing holistic support for recovery. Suboxone can help achieve long-term recovery and regain control over lives.

A Painless road to overcome your addiction torment with suboxone therapy!

Why Choose Suboxone for Opioid Addiction?

Not a Habit-Forming Suboxone is not as habit-forming as other opioid addiction treatments, so it is safer, unlike full opioid agonists, such as methadone, which can lead to dependency themselves. Suboxone’s buprenorphine component is a partial agonist. This means it has a ceiling effect, reducing the risk of overdose.
Convenient Suboxone treatment is convenient. It is typically administered as a sublingual tablet or film, dissolving under the tongue. Suboxone eliminates the need for injections or critical procedures, making it a user-friendly treatment option. Most Suboxone treatment is easy to use to maintain daily routines, jobs, and responsibilities.
Withdrawal More Comfortably Suboxone can help you get through withdrawal more comfortably to stay on the path to recovery. It can alleviate or eliminate withdrawal symptoms, so you will feel better during opioid treatment and not experience intense cravings. By reducing the discomfort of withdrawal and cravings, Suboxone allows you to regain control over your life.
Less Stressed Treatment Suboxone can help you feel relaxed and calmer. By alleviating withdrawal symptoms and cravings, Suboxone can bring relief on the path to recovery. However, Suboxone can indeed help you feel comfortable and more relaxed, but it’s essential to clarify that its primary purpose is not to induce relaxation or sedation.

Avoid!!!

When not to take Suboxone?

Patients considering Suboxone should be sure they fully understand the medication before starting the Suboxone online. There are certain situations when you should not use Suboxone. It’s recommended to consult the case with your Suboxone doctors online. It’s good to avoid Suboxone if you are:
Q
Allergic to Buprenorphine or Naloxone,
Q
Dealing with Respiratory Problems, Liver Disease, or Kidney disease
Q
Pregnant or Wishing to Conceive
Q
A Breastfeeding mother
Q
Alcoholic
Suboxone for opioid effect

How should I take “Suboxone”?

Use Suboxone as prescribed by your online Suboxone doctors in Ohio. Never overuse Suboxone or for longer than prescribed. Before taking a Suboxone film, drink water. It will help the sublingual film dissolve more easily. Place one suboxone film on the inside of your cheek. If you were recommended to take two films simultaneously, place the other on the opposite cheek. Keep the suboxone films in place until they have completely dissolved. If your physician tells you to take a third film, take it after the first two films have dissolved. Remember, do not chew or swallow the suboxone film because the medicine will also not work. Do not stop using Suboxone suddenly because it may not suit your health. Consult your doctor before stopping this medicine.

Requirements To Get A Suboxone Treatment

To receive Suboxone treatment, you must meet specific requirements. As per the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), you should meet specific requirements to qualify for suboxone treatment. Here are the requirements to get Suboxone treatment:
  • You must have a confirmed opioid dependence or addiction.
  • You will need to undergo a thorough medical assessment.
  • You should be in mild to moderate opioid withdrawal before starting Suboxone treatment.
  • You should leave alcohol or other benzodiazepines during the treatment.
  • Patients should be committed to their recovery journey and motivated to achieve abstinence from opioids.

Can You Become Addicted to Suboxone?

Some think Suboxone swaps one addiction for another, but it’s false. Suboxone helps decrease your body’s dependence on other opioids. However, some are hesitant to try Suboxone treatment in Ohio because of concerns they might become addicted to it. When used as prescribed, it’s very rare to develop an addiction to Suboxone. However, as with other medications, your body can develop a physical dependence on it. Remember, physical dependence is not the same as addiction. While the terms are used interchangeably, they mean two different things. Addiction is the loss of control over drugs despite worsening consequences. Dependence occurs when your body becomes used to a drug or substance, and you experience withdrawal symptoms when you stop using it. In the United States, Suboxone is classed as a Schedule III controlled substance, meaning it has a low risk of physical dependence.

We get it. What are you going through!

Why are the chances of Suboxone Dependency so Low?

Suboxone has low chances of dependency because of its Buprenorphine and naloxone components. Buprenorphine is known for its ceiling effects, which means that at a specific dose, it doesn’t lead to more potent opioid effects. The naloxone in Suboxone is an opioid receptor antagonist. It blocks the effects of opioids. If you misuse Suboxone, the naloxone component can precipitate withdrawal symptoms, acting as a deterrent against misuse.
If you’re concerned about misusing Suboxone, talk with your Suboxone doctors online. They can work with you to incorporate other treatment approaches. You can also reach out to SAMHSA at 800-662-HELP (4357)

Don’t overthink and book a consultation. Maybe we can help!

Frequently Asked Questions

We understand your struggle; that’s why we are here for help!

How long does Suboxone stay in your system?

The effects of Suboxone last for approximately 24 hours. This extended duration of action is one of the reasons to use Suboxone.

Does Suboxone drug show up on a drug test?

Suboxone will only appear on a drug test if the tester specifically tests for buprenorphine or naloxone. Standard drug tests, such as those used for employment or routine screenings, do not include buprenorphine or naloxone in their panels.

How long does Suboxone withdrawal last?

Withdrawal symptoms typically last for one month. However, this duration may vary depending on several factors, such as the duration of use, the dosage of Suboxone, and alcohol use. Physical withdrawal symptoms may begin within 24 hours after the last dose and last for maybe ten days.

What are the Symptoms of Suboxone Addiction?

The following are some of the physical symptoms of Suboxone abuse:

  • Blurred vision
  • Extreme drowsiness
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Itching
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Pain in the upper stomach
  • Poor coordination, limpness, or weakness
  • Problems with thinking
  • Shallow breathing
  • Slurred speech

Is Suboxone Safe?

It has become a common choice for treating drug abuse. Suboxone is considered a safe treatment unless there’s an underlying health issue. Its components have a low risk of addiction. Suboxone can support a healthier future without any complications.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. Take that one dose if it’s almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at once.

Can we mix Suboxone with alcohol?

Suboxone should not be mixed with alcohol. Mixing alcohol with Suboxone can have dangerous consequences. It can cause respiratory suppression, hypoxia, unconsciousness, and brain damage.

Can I use other medications while on Suboxone?

You can use it, but it’s recommended to consult your suboxone online doctor about any other medications or supplements you are taking. This consultation is to ensure there are no interactions with Suboxone.

Can I still work or drive while on Suboxone?

You can continue your day-to-day activities after taking Suboxone even though you can drive. However, it’s recommended to follow your doctor’s patterns and suggestions. Only they know the severity of your symptoms and health conditions.

Are there any side effects of Suboxone?

Yes, there are some side effects of Suboxone. Side effects of Suboxone may include:
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Headache
  • Back pain
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Nausea
  • Constipation
However, these symptoms will go away as your treatment progresses. If the symptoms become severe, contact your doctor immediately.

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My opioid abuse is getting worse day by day. I need Suboxone treatment online immediately. My MMJ Doctor helped me start my medicine within a day. After consulting with them online, they sent my recommendation, which is fast and convenient. Travis Afin
From my very first visit, they treated me with kindness and understanding. The doctors were highly knowledgeable, and the staff was always supportive. Suboxone has given me a new life, and I’m grateful for My MMJ Doctor’s guidance. Raven Tera
I was initially nervous about seeking help for my opioid addiction, but My MMJ Doctor made me confident. The doctors explained everything thoroughly, and I felt like they were genuinely trying to help me. I highly recommend them. Alikot Citif